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 15U General Discussion
 How much do the 15U teams in Georgia charge?
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Dale Ochodnicky

8 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2018 :  01:27:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How much do the 15U teams in Georgia charge?

Also, at what age would you allow your son to play summer ball and live in another state for the summer?

CaCO3Girl

1937 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2018 :  08:40:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
15u for Spring/Summer fees can range from $1000-$4000 depending on:

1. Where you play out of
2. What kind of coaching you have on staff
3. What tourneys you are playing in

This does not include hotel costs.

I have seen your post regarding 15u kids playing for free...but I've also seen your schedule. I know I would not have been interested in your team because most coaches recruit from their state and you will have the kids playing mostly in the north. My kid isn't going to go to school in ohio or michigan so I wouldn't be tempted to let him join your team. I'd focus up in that area if I were you. It would be highly appealing to the OH, MI, WI, KY crowd.
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COMET131

17 Posts

Posted - 11/16/2018 :  16:46:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
While free is very attractive, most GA families wouldn't do this regardless of their player's age, just because you can play all the baseball you want, at the highest level of competition, without ever leaving the Atlanta metro area, all while sleeping in your own bed, and with working parents getting to watch their kids play for the most part.

People travel HERE to play the best competition. The sheer number of players, the quality of the academies and many nationally known organizations, the former MLB players that coach/instruct, and the high level of high school ball, all make for an environment that's nearly impossible to beat. You can generally take the best travel team at each age group from a different region/state (TX,FL,CA being exceptions) and there will be 15+ teams here that are at that level. And we play each other every single weekend. A lot of good out-of-state teams have a rude awakening when they make their trip to play down South.

And CaCO3Girl makes a great point; with the Hope/Zell-Miller in-state scholarships and academic common market, most players that are not top D1 candidates, will look to stay in-state/region and need the southern exposure.
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oldschool22

34 Posts

Posted - 11/27/2018 :  15:15:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have spoken at length with this organization and we are bringing our son to Michigan this week for a tryout. They are very aware of the concerns any parent would have about their son playing out-of-state at such an early age.

From my observations of larger elite tournaments, Majors-caliber players in Georgia are literally superstars up north where kids simply donít have the length of playing seasons that we enjoy. We are doing this tryout because I liked Mr. Ochodnickyís knowledge and approach to the game and I believe their program may provide an opportunity for additional exposure for my son as well as a college/minor league baseball experience where he is totally on his own. We are looking forward to meeting them.
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CaCO3Girl

1937 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2018 :  07:57:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oldschool22

I have spoken at length with this organization and we are bringing our son to Michigan this week for a tryout. They are very aware of the concerns any parent would have about their son playing out-of-state at such an early age.

From my observations of larger elite tournaments, Majors-caliber players in Georgia are literally superstars up north where kids simply donít have the length of playing seasons that we enjoy. We are doing this tryout because I liked Mr. Ochodnickyís knowledge and approach to the game and I believe their program may provide an opportunity for additional exposure for my son as well as a college/minor league baseball experience where he is totally on his own. We are looking forward to meeting them.



Here is what I know:
18u: 4 out of the top 10 teams in the country (according to PG) are from GA.
17u: 1 out of top 10
16u: 8 out of the top 20
15u: 1 out of top 10
14u: 3 out of top 10

99% of all college kids go to a school within a 2 hour drive of their homes. The exception being the super stud athletes that are being courted by coaches across the US... even then the radius is only extended to 4 hours.

The beauty of PG is that teams travel from around the country to play in these tourneys. Not just any team, the BEST teams.

I wouldn't want my son going up north to play against weaker opponents, i want him playing against the best, and it has nothing to do with his age. It is because you only get better by playing against better.
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oldschool22

34 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2018 :  16:44:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thatís a popular cliche that makes sense on the surface, but there are underpinnings that make this opportunity worthy of consideration for us. The prospect of our son being at what is essentially a ďbaseball campĒ whereby he can focus on training during the week and play some very interesting venues each weekend is intruiging. We will know a lot more in a few days....
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CaCO3Girl

1937 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2018 :  07:09:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by oldschool22

Thatís a popular cliche that makes sense on the surface, but there are underpinnings that make this opportunity worthy of consideration for us. The prospect of our son being at what is essentially a ďbaseball campĒ whereby he can focus on training during the week and play some very interesting venues each weekend is intruiging. We will know a lot more in a few days....



What you do with your kid is 100% up to you.

What I am saying is this, this proposal makes 100% sense for someone in the Michigan area who doesn't have access to the bigger tourneys. I see zero sense in traveling AWAY from a baseball hotbed, if what you are wanting is exposure.

Edited by - CaCO3Girl on 11/29/2018 09:34:58
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Dale Ochodnicky

8 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  01:04:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Let me ask you this. Letís say a player is a Division I-caliber player but not recruited by Georgia or Georgia Tech. At that point wouldnít it be good to get some Big Ten looks? Would a kid from Georgia rather play at Michigan State or Savannah State if it came down to it? That answer probably varies from player to player but I bet some would say Michigan State.

Also I could be wrong about this but it seems to me some teams play at Lakepoint every single weekend. Some variety is good isnít it?

I think itís good to expand visibility as well. Letís say a kid does PBR and Perfect Game showcases in Georgia and plays their high school ball in Georgia. With all that Georgia exposure already, is it really crucial to play summer ball in Georgia as well? I believe that answer varies from person to person.

Now once a player has committed to a college, I think the free thing becomes even more appealing at that point.

I agree there are certain tournaments that are must attends for exposure.

I think a lot of the exposure comes down to the effort put into it. Iíll give you an example. If a player took the time to e-mail every single college coach in the country, how much more can they do? Some parents spend so much money on showcases and on these teams when they could just do the legwork themselves if you think about it.

One thing I think our team offers is a unique experience. For example, I think the kids become better friends than on most teams because they are spending more time together.

Some teams do not practice at all while I believe our players will be improving because of the nearby facility they will have all summer.

I do think one key to getting exposure is having talented teammates. Itís easier to convince a coach to come watch a team with ten D1 talents than one with three.
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oldschool22

34 Posts

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  09:38:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It does seem your lack of information about this organization and baseball outside of Georgia in general is leading you to short-minded conclusions. This organization (and most premier showcase teams) recruit from across the country and amass amazing talent. Two of the players are from Puerto Rico. They travel across the country, even into the south, providing great exposure to a large number of schools. No, itís not our preference that our son play collegiate ball far from home, but enhanced exposure is always a good thing. Moreover, this opportunity for our son to play with a collection of the very best ball players in the country is intriguing. We have our tryout this evening... should be interesting!
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oldschool22

34 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2018 :  23:41:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Since I supported this organization, I wanted to follow up on our visit with them in Michigan.

We did not meet the owner or any of the coaches until the actual tryout, but were greeted by an associate who showed us the exterior of the home they plan to use to house the out-of-state players. Unfortunately, we were unable to view much of anything as was promised over the phone. These and other changes were disconcerting. We were already understandably hesitant about leaving our son with strangers for two months, so these inconsistencies were dealbreakers.

Since we had already driven 12 hours to meet these folks, we went to their tryout. There were five other players from as far away as Idaho and Arizona. The tryout was a huge disappointment. They did not even make plans for a hitting workout beyond tee work and soft toss. Their defensive workout was elementary. My son was barely challenged. I was taken aback by the oohing and aahing from the coaches when he made a slick backhanded play on a grounder. I mean, this was a fairly standard play for any Majors-caliber infielder, so their reaction was noteworthy. They spent much of their time evaluating pitching, whether the players were pitchers or not.

In all honesty, these coaches seem to be novices and are doing nothing more than constructing a team of power pitchers, strong hitters and little else. The tryout was vaccuous. My son was so disappointed to have not had one challenge so,he could showcase his defensive talent. I initially felt disrespected in that we had traveled so far for such a silly ďtryoutĒ, but Iím concluding that these well-intentioned folks are just inexperienced and donít know any better.

We ended up leaving without even speaking with the coaches as the tryout was a joke and we would never play with them. Again, I think their intentions are noble and I do love the concept they have of offering a free season of baseball with great exposure at some awesome venues. But they will likely find out that building and sustaining success entails more than just assembling a pitching staff full of big arms.

One last side note... there was another Georgia player at this tryout and it was abundantly clear that he and my son were far and away the most well-rounded and fundamentally sound players. There were a few big arms (one threw 87), but the most polished players were the two Georgia boys.
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CaCO3Girl

1937 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2018 :  09:29:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think the likelihood of a player from GA playing in GA is high. There are 7 D 1 schools, but Savannah is attempting to go to D2, so we will say 6. What if those 6 aren't calling? Well, there is FL, TN, SC, NC, AL, LA, JUCO....all more likely than a GA kid playing in Michigan. And all of those schools come to GA to see kids. I've seen Auburn, GA, Tech, and AL all sitting together discussing the team on the field and asking the coaches about specific kids. GA kids aren't trapped or restricted to GA, but because there is a LOT of good baseball being played in GA...they come to us.

I agree that the amount of exposure comes down to the effort put into it. I also agree that 15u+ teams don't practice, but that is because many of the tourneys 15+ play in are 7 day events.

I also agree that the boys will probably get some good friendships out of spending 24/7 with a group of their peers....I just still don't see a reason to leave GA.

Oldschool22, I don't have a lack of information on baseball outside of GA...and I've already stated that for a michigan/Kentucky/Ohio kid this sounds like an ideal program. We have local teams amassing amazing talent, GA kids don't need to travel that far, kids across the country travel to play on GA teams. Last year my son's team had 3 Heck ECB houses dozens of out of state kids yearly, they have host families and everything. I don't understand why a GA kid would join this team. Not that it is a bad team, or a bad coach, or a bad concept... I just don't understand a GA kid doing it.
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bballman

1423 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2018 :  15:16:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Going to a D1 school is awesome, but there are some VERY good D2 teams in Georgia as well. Columbus State University, North Georgia College and State University and Georgia College are 3 teams in the Division 2 Peachbelt Conference that have all gone to the College World Series in the last few years. All play very competitive baseball. There's also University of West Georgia and Valdosta State who field very competitive teams.

For some, money is no obstacle. For some, playing out of state is just WAY too expensive given out of state tuition and the small amount of athletic scholarship baseball offers. If your son wants to play baseball and you want to stick with the reasonable cost of in state schools, look into some of the NCAA Division 2 schools around the state.
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Hurricane22

66 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2018 :  16:12:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Agreed, the great thing about baseball is it doesn't really matter where you play nowadays. You will be discovered most likely. Also a lot of kids are still growing and haven't reached their potential until maybe later teens or later. There really is no such thing as one size fits all and that is what I dig about the sport, I love the stories of where guys come from.

I'd be over the moon if my son plays "anywhere" and gets any kinds of assistance....people should treat it like you would a bonus at work, never expect it or think its a sure thing.

Edited by - Hurricane22 on 12/03/2018 17:13:09
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Reachout

1 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2018 :  19:35:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have followed this site for 3 years and have only posted 1 time. Forgot my username so had to re register to respond to this topic. My son and I attended this tryout. It was run with a very professional staff. I have seen tryouts at the top major teams in Ga. and this tryout rates right there with them. Very impressive facility with a new one being constructed. Indoor facility with turf throughout and large enough to take outfield.
College coach was running tryouts and Owner was there as well. College player on hand to assist in drills. Was met upon arrival by director of coaching. Very informative and up front about what they are looking for and expect. I was extremely impressed to say the least . I have attended D1 college camps etc... The only difference is I was not paying for this. Everything the staff told me before I arrived is exactly what we got.
The owner loves the sport and is not in the game for the money. Yes this team is free to play on Yes this team has great atheletes. No the owner does not have a son on the team. Yes the owner has age groups from 8 - 18 I think, but only charges enough to pay for uniforms and tournament fees. Basically pays coaches out of his pocket for all ages.
This guy gives back to the community and tries to develope kids without parents having to work 3 jobs just so kids can play at a competitive level. I don't know why Oldschool says it was poorly run.
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